Campus is crowded, alternatives needed

Staff Editorial

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Welcome to Hoboville, USA.

The population is ever growing and the people dwell in any possible space that will fit a human body.

Especially at lunch.

Like the exponentially rising human population, Cal is also reflecting these steady patterns of growth. Cal has experienced an increase of 100 students this year, bringing enrollment to 2,739, according to counseling statistics.

But as the number of students on campus increases, the school size stays constant.

The problem is most notable at lunch, which has become survival of the fittest.

Ideally, Cal should be reopened for seniors to leave campus and grab a bite to eat. Cal’s now in its third year of a closed campus, but few changes have been made to address overcrowding at lunch.

The fight to obtain a table or chair in the commons has turned into a gladiator battle.

Lack of space has caused groups of people to resort to eating on the ground resembling peasants at the feet of those lucky or quick enough to snag a table.

Combining seating in the commons and outside, only 596 students, or 28 percent of the student body, can sit at a table or on a bench.

The remaining 2,191 students have to sit down on the dirty ground to eat lunch.

Administrators need to consider some of the following solutions to the problem.

Some schools offer two lunch periods and others allow an extended lunch period for students to go off  campus to eat.

If the hopes of an open campus are dashed for good, then some other alternative options should at least be explored.

Allowing the football stadium to be open during lunch could create more space.

The same goes for the main building, which now appears to be closed at lunch for the entire year.

In the past, it was open for at least part of the year.

Simply adding a few more tables around campus would help as well.

If none of these suggestions are viable options, then lunch on campus could be made more bearable if food trucks made regular appearances.

No matter what the solution is, administrators needs to try something.

This isn’t an issue that will go away anytime soon.

An effort to fix this overwhelming problem  is better than no attempt at all.