Trump, Bush and natural disaster recovery

Flooding+has+completly+overtaken+most+highways+in+Purto+Rico%2C+preventing+people+from+safely+commuting+to+get+help.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Trump, Bush and natural disaster recovery

Flooding has completly overtaken most highways in Purto Rico, preventing people from safely commuting to get help.

Flooding has completly overtaken most highways in Purto Rico, preventing people from safely commuting to get help.

Photo courtesy of The Atlantic

Flooding has completly overtaken most highways in Purto Rico, preventing people from safely commuting to get help.

Photo courtesy of The Atlantic

Photo courtesy of The Atlantic

Flooding has completly overtaken most highways in Purto Rico, preventing people from safely commuting to get help.

Kiley Borba, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Bush administration’s handling of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 was considered one of the greatest failures of the decade, 

President Trump’s handling of Puerto Rico will go down as one of the greatest disgraces of modern US history. 

One of the major criticisms of how Katrina was handled by the government was that the response of action and relief was not only delayed, but unplanned and unorganized. 

According to articles published by PBS at the time, the Federal Emergency Management Agency had recently joined with the relatively new department, Homeland Security.  But FEMA was unprepared for a large-scale natural disaster such as Katrina because the department had been preparing more for possible terrorist attacks in the wake of 9/11.

With FEMA no longer being it’s own singular department, layers of bureaucracy were added, preventing relief from arriving quicker. Some consider this an example of government failing to provide aide for citizens in need of help. 

But then we have Donald J. Trump. 

After Puerto Rico was hit by Hurricane Maria on Sept. 20, it took five days before any officials from the White House came, and the ones that did eventually come were only there to “survey the damage,” according to a report in The Atlantic

The small island in the Carribean with 3.5 million people had 100 percent of its electrical grid knocked out and only half of the island had access to clean drinking water. Half of the hospitals closed, only a handful of airports open, and most roads were inaccessible. 

But that didn’t stop Trump from going on Twitter to comment about Puerto Rico’s situation. He tweeted: “Texas & Florida are doing great but Puerto Rico, which was already suffering from broken infrastructure & massive debt, is in deep trouble.” 

He went on to tweet: “It’s old electrical grid, which was in terrible shape, was devastated. Much of the Island was destroyed, with billions of dollars owed to Wall Street and the banks which, sadly, must be dealt with. Food, water and medical are top priorities – and doing well.”

You know, it might just be me, but I don’t think any decent person would bring up how much money someone owes when their house is on fire.

A couple days passed before Trump finally waived the Jones Act for 10 days, allowing ships not flying the US flag to bring relief and port at the island. But because of the lack of access to roads and labor, thousands of shipping containers full of food, water, and supplies were stranded and unable to reach American citizens in need.

Will this be one of the greatest failures of our President? Without a doubt. 

Will this make the handling of Katrina look like an understaffed field trip? Absolutely.